It’s the Haves Against the Have-Nots

Rich Actress Pleads Not Guilty in College Scandal

Acress, Laurie Loughlin, on her way to court after being accused in the college scandal.

Photo courtesy of Google Images.

Acress, Laurie Loughlin, on her way to court after being accused in the college scandal.

Alexis Owens, Editor in Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The college admission scandal has made a dark mark on what should be an exciting time for high school graduating seniors. Many qualified and deserving young men and women have been rejected from colleges nationwide in order to let privileged people manipulate the system and gain an illegal admission.

What’s more is that the parents of well-to-do students feel they have a right to pay their way in over hard-working, ethical students who don’t have money. It’s privileged over the poor. The Have and the Have-Nots.

One of the accuses, actress Laurie Loughlin has refused to plead guilty to charges such as conspiracy despite the fact that one of the college coaches recently plead guilty and is planning to testify against Loughlin.

Prosecutors say the “Full House” actress and Giannulli paid $500,000 to a fake charity to get their two daughters accepted into the University of Southern California; falsely designating them as crew recruits.

“What this shows is that people who feel that they have rank and privilege and money think that they can do anything, and that’s what makes people so upset about this case,” said CBS News legal analyst Rikki Klieman (CBS.com).

Tschudy says the college admission scandal is unacceptable.

For college-bound seniors at Lancaster High School, the college admission scandal is an insult. Many well-deserving students have worked hard to qualify for college admission. Many LHS seniors have reason to be proud of getting admitted to colleges and universities on their own merit.

“It’s a pretty rough feeling…knowing all your work could be for nothing,” said Sophia Boyden, a senior at LHS.

“It means you worked hard for no reason,” said Shy’kwuan Jones, also a senior.

Fairfield County is not Hollywood. The students are not able to afford the luxury of buying their way into college. When asked if their parents would even consider such a notion, students adamantly said no.

“No, they would not even want to pay for me to go, let alone get in,” said LHS senior Kayley Tschudy.

“Absolutely not,” said Boyden.

“My family is driven by hard work and dedication. My parents would push for the right decisions rather than cheating in some way.”

Prosecutors have said that the alleged college admission scandal is the largest of its kind ever prosecuted and involved 50 defendants across six states.

The reason LHS seniors are dedicated to achieving college admission the ethical way is that they have a sense of pride and self-respect. Eye of the Gale applauds the LHS seniors who have been accepted to colleges and universities on their own merit. Congratulations and well done!