Honoring First Responders

LHS student pays it forward in a monumental way

LHS+student%2C+Jacob+Spires+stands+behind+the+monument+he+created+for+first+responders.
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Honoring First Responders

LHS student, Jacob Spires stands behind the monument he created for first responders.

LHS student, Jacob Spires stands behind the monument he created for first responders.

LHS student, Jacob Spires stands behind the monument he created for first responders.

LHS student, Jacob Spires stands behind the monument he created for first responders.

Alexis Owens, Editor in Chief

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First responders selflessly put their lives on the line for others and often without appreciation. Lancaster High School student Jacob Spires felt a need to pay respect and express gratitude for the sacrifice they make by establishing a monument in their honor.

As an Eagle Scout, the highest level of the Boy Scouts, Spires was given the responsibility of completing a project that would impact a school, religious institution, or community in a positive way. Spires decided to honor first responders by raising money to purchase a monument that would be a lasting reminder of their service to all.  The sophomore raised $3,500 in a period of six months, and the monument is now completed and standing proud in Fountain Square Park in downtown Lancaster.

Spires monument in downtown square

The process of completing his goal was to start with send an application to the Eagle Board Committee. Spires estimated that the project would cost a little over 3,500 dollars. The project also required that in order for the Eagle Scouts to grow within their community, all proceeds for the monument had to be raised through donations as opposed to the scouts providing their own funding.

“It didn’t come out of my own money. The money that paid for this monument was all donations from local businesses.”

The LHS teenager’s accomplishment and dedication to first responders is something that local officials say is very meaningful to them.

“We’re very appreciative of somebody that young thinking about us and what we do for the community,” said Lancaster Fire Chief Dave Ward.

Spires said that the monument project was a great experience that was first inspired by what he says was a lack of respect for first responders from people across the nation.

“I am not a fan of bullying, and after seeing so much disrespect towards the first responders, I decided to do something about it,” he said.

As a result of his project, Spires has received acclaim in local television news and the Lancaster Eagle Gazette. His family is is very proud of his accomplishment.

“Super proud of me that I have done this project. They put my news interviews on auto repeat and said they were beyond proud of me.”

What will the Eagle Scout do next? Spires says he will focus on finishing high school.

“I honestly do not know what is next on my agenda. I am going to finish in high school and see what career field I would like to go into.”